THEATRE COLLECTION
MADAME de SADE
The Review - THEATRE by DAVID WEINBERG
Published 7 December 2006
 
Saint Sade of hedonism



FRINGE:
MADAME SADE

Lion and Unicorn

The aesthetics of cruelty and passion bring to life the enduring presence of one of histories most notorious saints of hedonism in this period drama.
The life of the Marquis De Sade has inspired duel adulation and contempt since his ideas and sexual exploits first entered the realm of cultural discourse.
Here we have an opportunity to see his life and times through the eyes of Madame De Sade.
The production very deliberately and successfully appeals to the senses but at times the narrative is dense and confusing.
The design elements are utilised very effectively in establishing the environment and aesthetic but do very little in the way of changing what is ultimately a two dimensional script.
Co-directors Dumle Kogbara and Victor Sobchak do an admirable job of organising the various elements of this spirited production. Dawn Marie Wilkinsonís performance as Madame De Sade fully captures the duality of the central characterís existence within her troubled family and historical dynamic.
Jocelyn Osorio (Madame De Simiane) and Anne Winkles (Madame De Saint-Fond) mirror each other nicely as conflicting saint and sinner.
The one glaring flaw in the casting for this piece is that all of the actors appear to be relatively the same age.
Alexandra Delarosa (Madame De Montreuil) brings considerable ability to her role but appears to be roughly the same age as the actress playing her daughter. Heavy makeup is intended to conceal this but veneer is no substitute for real substance and this applies generally to the production as a whole.
Until December 23